Arthur Dent and Titus Pullo


JMJ

The Readings for Monday in the 11th week of Ordinary Time (C1)

But I say to you, offer no resistance to one who is evil…

If anyone wants to go to law with you over your tunic, hand him your cloak as well. Should anyone press you into service for one mile, go with him for two miles. Give to the one who asks of you, and do not turn your back on one who wants to borrow.
This thing about walking a mile is regarding Roman soldiers. The Roman soldiers were occupying Israel, and in the eyes of all, these greedy, violent, rowdy, armed Gentiles are a chaotic evil force present in God’s holy land. A Roman soldier could, at any time, demand that you help him and force you to walk with him for a mile doing X, Y, and Z. Jesus says do it and then go two miles with him instead. Imagine that this must have sounded like. This man who talks to tax collectors is telling you to do this oppressive thing that the occupying Army can order for you to do. More than that he’s telling you to go twice as far. To comply with injustice and then to give more.
Who is evil?  It’s not about who “does” evil, either – regardless of what the NABRE says.
The Greek here actually says, “Do not resist the Evil One.
The Latin (non resistere malo) “Do not resist evil”.
St John Chrysostom says this is an important difference:

Having therefore mentioned the ancient law, and recognized it all, He signifies again, that it is not our brother who hath done these deeds, but the evil one. For this cause he hath also subjoined, “But I say unto you, that ye resist not the evil one.” He did not say, “resist not your brother,” but “the evil one,” signifying that on his motion men dare so to act; and in this way relaxing and secretly removing most of our anger against the aggressor, by transferring the blame to another.

 When someone does something against us in the world, it is not them – as an actor – who is evil; rather the evil is something they are being tempted to do. The one tempting them to act in such a way is the Evil One.  It is against him that we have a fight.

When it comes to our brother or sister who is doing harm to us, however, the struggle is not against them but to liberate them from the clutches of Satan. They are trapped and we must free them. This is why Jesus tells us not to hit them back, but rather to let them hit us again; not only to let them steal our coat but also give them everything else we have; not to let them force us to do something we don’t want but also to do things that they don’t know they want yet out of the kindness of our heart. St John says to act in this way will let them see we love them. If they see that we love them we may have a chance to free them from the evil one who has his claws in them.

When you think about it nobody has a reason to attack Christians. In fact, the only person with a reason to attack Christians is Satan. That he gets other people to do it on his behalf and gets them to take the blame is a score for him. That he gets other people to do it on his behalf and gets us Christians to blame the other folks is a double score on his behalf for he gets them to sin and gets us to sin as well. Further, he has ruined our witness. Because let’s be honest, if we’re reacting against their hate we are judging them. And everybody knows that Jesus said judge not lest ye be judged. Reacting in violence – even legal violence – to violence is judgment.

When someone is sitting in the clutches of Satan and a Christian does something that pushes that person farther into those clutches… we have failed.  What Jesus gives us here is a way to subversively do what they want us to do and yet show them Jesus.

If any time someone asked us to do something we said okay and then we did it out of love for them and for Jesus, the world would be a very different place. Imagine no lawsuits about wedding cakes. Imagine no torturous spitting matches in front of abortion clinics. Imagine no Twitter wars. Imagine peaceful loving service leading to salvation.

Look, I understand that we have a legal right to do these things! But just because the law says it’s okay does not mean it is salvific for us or for others. Jesus gives us these tools: let them hit you again. Do what they order you to do. Pray for them. Love them. Nowhere in this list does he save file a lawsuit against them. Nowhere in this list as does he say take them to court or take them to jail. Nowhere are we invited to fight them back.

We need to watch ourselves: we may be the last chance to be rescued from Satan these folks have.

In The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Douglas Adams posits that it’s possible to fly if you fall down and while you’re falling you forget to finish the fall.

There is an art to flying, or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss. … Clearly, it is this second part, the missing, that presents the difficulties.

So, as you’re falling if you suddenly look to the side and say oh look some luggage you might miss the Earth and then begin to fly. That’s what Jesus is telling us to do here. Distract someone so they don’t do evil. Don’t let them finish their fall. Give them love back instead and they may fly.

Author: Huw Richardson

A Dominican Tertiary living in San Francisco, CA. He has worked in tech (mostly) since 1999 and enjoys cooking, keto, cats, long urban hikes, and SF Beer Week.