This is our Mother

כָּל־מַעְיָנַי בָּךְ

JMJ

The Readings for the Solemnity of the Assumption of Our Lady

Then God’s temple in heaven was opened, and the ark of his covenant could be seen in the temple. There were flashes of lightning, rumblings, and peals of thunder, an earthquake, and a violent hailstorm. Then… a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.

Hebrews 11:19ff

THERE’S this interesting notation in the Wiki Article on Mary (yes, yes, I know… the Wiki): “Hyppolitus of Thebes says that Mary lived for 11 years after the death of her son Jesus, dying in 41 AD.” That would put her in her 50s or very early 60s, depending on how young she was when our Lord was born, which makes some sense. This would have been a traumatic event for Early Christians, one that a brother in my formation class believes he sees noted in the Apostolic Epistles.

If the Church is the New Israel, then Mary is the new Ark, revealed in the new Temple. The typology doubles back on itself here: for the Temple, the presence of God on Earth is the Messiah, who is also God from whom comes forth his own Mother, who is also a type of the Church.

And since she is a Type of the Church, there is a way in which all that is true of her is also true of us. For as, through her Son, she now enjoys the blessedness of the Vision of God, we too are called to enjoy that vision. We, too, are called to pass through the torn veil into the Holy of Holies and see the very face of God. We only do this by virtue of her son and by her own prayers together with those of all the saints. We come to stand at the foot of the Heavenly Zion, where, eventually, all of man must come.

In the Office of Readings today, the third Psalm prayed is Psalm 87 (Fundamenta ejus). As if often the case, Liturgy of the Hours has more of a free rendition of the text. The older English text (such as the King James and the Coverdale) come closer to the literal meanings of the text:

HER foundations are upon the holy hills: the Lord loveth the gates of Sion more than all the dwellings of Jacob.
Very excellent things are spoken of thee: thou city of God.
I will think upon Rahab and Babylon: with them that know me.
Behold ye the Philistines also: and they of Tyre, with the Morians; lo, there was he born.
And of Sion it shall be reported that he was born in her: and the most High shall stablish her.
The Lord shall rehearse it when he writeth up the people: that he was born there.
The singers also and trumpeters shall he rehearse: All my fresh springs shall be in thee.

Coverdale Psalm 87 (BCP 1662)

To come into God’s covenant is to take Zion – that is Mary – for our mother. She is the city cherished by the Lord. All our “fresh springs” are in her, that is to say, that in her all find their home.

Author: Huw Raphael

A Dominican Tertiary living in San Francisco, CA. He feeds the homeless and is studying to be a Roman Catholic Deacon. He enjoys cooking, keto, cats, long urban hikes, and SF Beer Week.

%d bloggers like this: